Progressive Index-Of

⎕io=0 is assumed throughout.

A recent Forum post motivated investigations into the progressive index-of functions in the FinnAPL Idiom Library:

pix  ← {((⍴⍺)⍴⍋⍋⍺⍳⍺,⍵) ⍳ ((⍴⍵)⍴⍋⍋⍺⍳⍵,⍺)}   ⍝ FinnAPL Idiom 1
pixa ← {((⍋⍺⍳⍺,⍵)⍳⍳⍴⍺) ⍳ ((⍋⍺⍳⍵,⍺)⍳⍳⍴⍵)}   ⍝ FinnAPL Idiom 5

In this note, we:

  • explain what is progressive index-of
  • explain why the two functions work
  • investigate the performance of the two functions
  • provide a more general solution

Progressive Index-Of

Progressive index-of is like index-of () except that each find “uses up” the target of that find. There are no duplicates in the result with the possible exception of ≢⍺ (for “not found”). Thus:

      x←'mississippi'
      y←'dismiss'

      x pix y
11 1 2 0 4 3 5

The following chart illustrates a step-by-step derivation of each progressive index:

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

m i s s i s s i p p  i      d i s m i s s
                           11
m i s s i s s i p p  i      d i s m i s s
                           11 1
m i s s i s s i p p  i      d i s m i s s
                           11 1 2
m i s s i s s i p p  i      d i s m i s s
                           11 1 2 0
m i s s i s s i p p  i      d i s m i s s
                           11 1 2 0 4
m i s s i s s i p p  i      d i s m i s s
                           11 1 2 0 4 3
m i s s i s s i p p  i      d i s m i s s
                           11 1 2 0 4 3 5

It is possible to compute the progressive index without looping or recursion, as the two FinnAPL functions demonstrate.

Why It Works

The basic idea of ⍺ pix ⍵ is to substitute for each item of and an equivalent representative, collectively c and d, whence the result obtains as c⍳d. The equivalent representative used here is ranking, specifically the ranking of the indices in .

The ranking of an array is a permutation of order ≢⍵. The smallest major cell is assigned 0; the next smallest is assigned 1; and so on. Ties are resolved by favoring the earlier-occurring cell. The ranking can be computed by ⍋⍋⍵. For example:

      x ⍪ ⍉⍪ ⍋⍋x
m i s s i s  s i p p i
4 0 7 8 1 9 10 2 5 6 3

      y ⍪ ⍉⍪ ⍋⍋y
d i s m i s s
0 1 4 3 2 5 6

⍺ pix ⍵ works on two different rankings of indices in :

⍋⍋⍺⍳⍺,⍵    rankings of indices in of and , favoring
⍋⍋⍺⍳⍵,⍺    rankings of indices in of and , favoring

The first ⍴⍺ items of the former are those for and the first ⍴⍵ of the latter are those for , and we get

pix ← {((⍴⍺)⍴⍋⍋⍺⍳⍺,⍵) ⍳ ((⍴⍵)⍴⍋⍋⍺⍳⍵,⍺)}

The second version depends on the following properties of permutations. Let p be a permutation. Then p[⍋p] ←→ ⍳≢p, the identity permutation, and therefore ⍋p is the inverse of p. Furthermore, p[p⍳⍳≢p] ←→ ⍳≢p and so p⍳⍳≢p is also the inverse of p. The inverse is unique (that’s why it’s called the inverse), therefore ⍋p ←→ p⍳⍳≢p.

      p←97?97         ⍝ a random permutation

      p[⍋p]    ≡ ⍳≢p
1
      p[p⍳⍳≢p] ≡ ⍳≢p
1
      (⍋p)     ≡ p⍳⍳≢p
1

The two rankings are permutations (because the leftmost functions are ) and we just need the first ⍴⍺ items of the former and the first ⍴⍵ items of the latter. Thus:

pixa ← {((⍋⍺⍳⍺,⍵)⍳⍳⍴⍺) ⍳ ((⍋⍺⍳⍵,⍺)⍳⍳⍴⍵)}

Performance

We note that both versions of pix contain the expressions ⍺⍳⍺,⍵ and ⍺⍳⍵,⍺, but the latter is just a rotation of the former. Thus:

pixb ← {i←⍺⍳⍺,⍵ ⋄ ((⍴⍺)⍴⍋⍋i) ⍳ ((⍴⍵)⍴⍋⍋(⍴⍺)⌽i)}
pixc ← {i←⍺⍳⍺,⍵ ⋄ ((⍋i)⍳⍳⍴⍺) ⍳ ((⍋(⍴⍺)⌽i)⍳⍳⍴⍵)}

Which is faster? The answer may surprise.

      x←?1e6⍴3e5
      y←?2e5⍴3e5

      cmpx 'x pixb y' 'x pixc y'
  x pixb y → 9.15E¯2 |  0% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕
  x pixc y → 9.21E¯2 |  0% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕

A few factors about the Dyalog APL interpreter are relevant to this performance:

  • Computing ⍺⍳⍵,⍺ as a rotation of an already computed i←⍺⍳⍺,⍵ produces a worthwhile speed-up, although only on a relatively small part of the overall computation.
          i←x⍳x,y
          cmpx '(⍴x)⌽i' 'x⍳y,x'
      (⍴x)⌽i → 5.00E¯4 |     0% ⎕⎕                            
      x⍳y,x  → 7.19E¯3 | +1337% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕
    
  • Both and have special code for small range data.
          s←?1e6⍴5e5           ⍝ small range
          t←s ⋄ t[t⍳⌈/t]←2e9   ⍝ large range
    
          cmpx 's⍳s' 't⍳t'
      s⍳s → 5.87E¯3 |    0% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕                     
      t⍳t → 2.00E¯2 | +240% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕
    
          cmpx '⍋s' '⍋t'
      ⍋s → 3.25E¯2 |   0% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕     
      ⍋t → 3.84E¯2 | +18% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕
    
  • ⍋⍵ has special code when is a permutation.
          p←1e6?1e6           ⍝ p is a permutation
          q←p ⋄ q[999999]←⊃q  ⍝ q is not; both are small-range
    
          cmpx '⍋p' '⍋q'
      ⍋p → 5.81E¯3 |    0% ⎕⎕⎕                           
    * ⍋q → 5.71E¯2 | +882% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕
    
  • We saw previously that if p is a permutation then ⍋p ←→ p⍳⍳⍴p. The special code for ⍋p makes the two expressions run at roughly the same speed. The slight advantage for ⍋⍋x versus (⍋x)⍳⍳⍴x would increase if and when ⍋⍋ is recognized as an idiom.
          cmpx '⍋p' 'p⍳⍳⍴p'
      ⍋p    → 6.02E¯3 |  0% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕   
      p⍳⍳⍴p → 6.57E¯3 | +9% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕
    
          cmpx '⍋⍋x' '(⍋x)⍳⍳⍴x'
      ⍋⍋x      → 3.16E¯2 |  0% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕ 
      (⍋x)⍳⍳⍴x → 3.25E¯2 | +2% ⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕⎕
    
    

A General Solution

Index-of works on cells rather than just scalars. Likewise, progressive index-of can also be extended to work on cells. The core algorithm remains the same. The generalization obtains by first reshaping to have the same rank as (having major cells with the same shape), applying the core algorithm, and then reshaping its result to have the same leading shape as the original . Thus:

pixd←{
  m←≢⍺
  r←0⌊1-⍴⍴⍺
  n←×/r↓⍴⍵
  i←⍺⍳⍺⍪(n,1↓⍴⍺)⍴⍵
  (r↓⍴⍵) ⍴ ((⍋i)⍳⍳m) ⍳ ((⍋m⌽i)⍳⍳n)
}

   xx              yy
mmmm            dddd
iiii            iiii
ssss            ssss
ssss            mmmm
iiii            iiii
ssss            ssss
ssss            ssss
iiii     
pppp     
pppp                                  x
iiii                               mississippi

   ⍴xx             ⍴yy                y
11 4            7 4                dismiss

   xx pixd yy                         x pixd y
11 1 2 0 4 3 5                     11 1 2 0 4 3 5

   xx pixd 3 5 4⍴yy                   x pixd 3 5⍴y
11  1  2  0  4                     11  1  2  0  4
 3  5 11  7  6                      3  5 11  7  6
11 10 11 11 11                     11 10 11 11 11

Postscript
After having written the above, I discovered an alternative exposition on progressive index-of by Bob Smith entitled Anatomy of an Idiom. Adám Brudzewsky has produced a Stack Exchange lesson and a Jupyter Notebook based on Smith’s text.

There is also an exposition in J on the same topic, with a more verbose but easier-to-understand derivation.

2 thoughts on “Progressive Index-Of

  1. I don’t understand your comment.

          y←'dismiss'

          y ⍪ ⍉ ⍪ ⍋⍋y
    d i s m i s s
    0 1 4 3 2 5 6

          ⍋⍋y
    0 1 4 3 2 5 6

    The two expressions don’t give the same results. (The first expression labels each item of ⍋⍋y for easier interpretation.)

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