Phil Goacher (05-11-40 – 09-03-18)

Phil Goacher
I attended Phil Goacher’s funeral yesterday. He probably had no idea of just how much he would influence the development of APL. I first met Phil at W S Atkins which is a large UK engineering consultancy. There was a sub unit called Atkins Computing which provided internal computing support to the engineers and, crucially, provided a time sharing service to external users. He became my manager when I moved from supporting the transportation program suite to the brand new APL team.

Phil was more manager and business man than programmer but he had an engineering background in Gas distribution and thus the mathematical bias that seems common to APL users.

Phil was the sort of man with an eye for a business opportunity and when a advert appeared from someone who wanted to set up an APL consultancy with a limited objective to provide resources to Rank Xerox (UK arm of Xerox Corp) he turned up along with half his team. Phil was a wheeler dealer type and had already talked to the recruiter, persuaded him that he could manage the team, and then interviewed the candidates. So I wound up being interviewed by my existing manager. Following this Phil decided we only needed a salesman and we could set the consultancy up with a much wider remit. Phil recruited Ted Hare who was one of Atkin’s top salesmen and Dyadic Systems was born.

Phil did all of the necessary legal and administration to get Dyadic off the ground and became the company’s administration guy. He bought an Apple 2 with VisiCalc so was early into the spreadsheet concept. It must be said that all five of the people who started Dyadic were “early adopters” by nature.

Dyadic was quite successful as an APL consultancy but wanted to do more. I am not sure who instigated it (I was too busy consulting) but it was probably Phil’s idea to develop an APL of our own. Knowing Phil this was probably a business eye and a request from Pam Geisler who was Pauline Brand’s sister (Pauline was an early recruit that we “acquired” from Atkin’s) but, more importantly, high up in the management of Zilog. Zilog was developing a new 16 bit chip, Z8000, that was going to push them up market from the 8-bit chip with which they had had enormous success – Z80. IBM had been pushing APL as the future, and it was incumbent on competitors to provide an APL offering.

Phil and Dave Crossley will have been the instigators of recruiting John Scholes, who had also been at Atkin’s, and teaming him with me to develop Dyalog (Dyadic + Zilog). Dave provided the management overview of that project while Phil and Ted had to worry about financing John and I, who were not bringing in consultancy money. It was at this point that Dyalog APL became a UNIX and C project. It was much later when I read Brian Kernighan’s obituary that I realised just how early we had got into UNIX and C.

Dyalog APL was not the instant success that Dyadic hoped for. It had increased costs. We needed an office and the paraphernalia that goes with selling a product rather than brains. Dyadic ran into financial issues and was taken over by Lynwood Scientific, who made terminals with Zilog Z8000 chips inside. I think they really wanted the Z8000 expertise that John and I had acquired. As part of that takeover Phil, Ted and Dave had to leave with a derisory pay-off and I lost touch until I learnt of his death a fortnight ago.

From the perspective of APL language development Phil is not a tower of strength. However, from the perspective of having provided the impetus and drive to get Dyalog APL developed, he is very important.

NOTE: For anyone interested in reading more about the early days of APL, see the Vector special on the first 25 years of Dyalog Ltd.

Supporting the Community – Update

You may have been wondering what has been happening with Jo Shaw (daughter of our Customer Account Manager, Karen) the England pool player who Dyalog have sponsored in the past, so we thought it was time for an update.

After getting a new job in December 2014, Jo moved from Hampshire to Wiltshire and joined the Wiltshire Ladies county pool team. After a successful first season with them, Jo again qualified to play for England as a reserve player in May 2016 but the exciting news that she was expecting a baby meant that she was not able to take up her place in the team – unfortunately the Nation’s Cup event was happening at the exact same time the baby was due. Jo also found that she was not able to practice or play pool during the later stages of her pregnancy as she was just not able to bend over the table(!) so this meant she had to take a back seat with the Wiltshire Ladies county team too.

Jo’s daughter Remy was born on 18 October 2016 and Remy has been a keen supporter of Wiltshire Ladies since she was born – she even has her own team shirt!

Jo and Remy have recently been to the EBPF National Finals to support Jo’s Wiltshire teammates as they became National Ladies Champions for the first time. Jo was disappointed that she wasn’t able to play a bigger part in the victory but being a mother is now her top priority and she was pleased that her team did so well.

After a lot of thought Jo has now made the very difficult decision to take some time out from both county and national pool to concentrate on being a mum. She plans to be back in a year or so once Remy is a bit older and Dyalog fully expect her to win back her place in the England team – we will be there to support her when she does!

Dan Baronet

Dan Baronet

Dan Baronet

We do not know the details, but Dan’s luck ran out this week. On Tuesday, as he headed South from Nevada into California, en route to Mexico on the first leg of a four month motor cycle adventure to South America, something went wrong … Dan lost control of the bike and collided with a motor home, and many of us are now struggling to comprehend that Dan won’t be back.

Dan made friends everywhere that he went. On our annual Dyalog skiing “retreat” (we frequently did real work on prototypes of new tools, honest!), I was always impressed (while trying to hide my slight embarrassment) by the way Dan always kicked off conversations with hotel staff. Whether the waiters and waitresses were native Italians from the resort town – or migrants as hotel staff frequently are – Dan would typically know enough words in some shared language to get the conversation off to a good start (or he would extend his vocabulary on the spot). This always guaranteed us service with a smile, and excellent advice on which wine to order for dinner.

Dan gave as well as he got: on the slopes, Dan was always the first to stop by anyone who had fallen over and was struggling to get back up. Dan has friends all over the world and always took the time to visit them when he could, to keep the friendships alive. He was also happy to open his own home to travellers, both my kids had little Canadian adventures as guests of Dan and his family in Quebec, and Dyalog team members would also “couch-surf” chez Dan.

At work, Dan also loved extending his vocabulary. He remembered more details of different APL dialects than anyone else that I know, and was an expert in migrating code from one system to another. He also knew the weaknesses of each system, and was a feared visitor to vendor booths at APL conferences. Dan would mischievously sit down to play with a new APL system, try a couple of his favourite edge cases, and usually manage to crash new (and some old) APL interpreters within seconds.

But even when crashing interpreters, Dan was really trying to help the vendor produce a more stable platform. At work, as on the ski slopes, Dan was one of the few people who was always going out of his way to help. When he had spent time learning a new technique, or how to use a new tool, he would go the extra mile to create a utility library, document it, presented it at conferences and APL user meetings. He also did the really hard part – writing an article about it, making frequent contributions to Vector and other publications: http://archive.vector.org.uk/?qry=baronet&submit=search. He also enjoyed teaching APL, as an instructor at I.P.Sharp Associates and in the modern era as the author of numerous tutorials at https://www.youtube.com/user/APLtrainer.

More than 30 years ago, as an APL rookie at I.P.Sharp Associates, I was fortunate to meet, work with, and learn from Dan when he and I both found ourselves at IPSA Copenhagen. In addition to a general interest in tools, I shared Dan’s interest in the migration of code between APL systems, and flying airplanes. Dan actually flew small aircraft (and helicopters!) and I, like so many other friends and colleagues, admired him and got invited along for rides.

A decade and a half later in 2005, as the new CTO of Dyalog, I was keen to add an APL toolsmith to the company. Despite his location in Montreal, Dan was at the top of my list. Dan continued to live in Montreal but was a frequent guest in Bramley, coming over several times a year to spend some weeks to work with the growing “APL Tools Team” – and with the core development team on improving the quality of the interpreter by crashing it in as many ways as he could think of.

When his imagination ran out, he wrote code to generate even more ways to crash the interpreter. Dan has been cursed loudly many times, and will be remembered – if for no other reason than that it will be a long time before we are able to close the last “issues” that he logged in our problem tracking system. The quality of Dyalog APL has increased enormously in the last decade, and we have much to thank Dan for. Dan also “poured the concrete” for the foundations of the source code management tool (SALT) and the User Command framework that we are all starting to take for granted, and contributed to many other pieces of our growing collection of tools.

C-GSXN in Toronto

Dan often flew himself to APL User Meetings

Dan was an adventurer. He skied, snowboarded, snowshoe’d, biked, skated, hiked and flew – and with his great sense of humour and warm personality, he was able to entice many of us to come along with him to share. He photographed and brought his video camera, although he would often manage a 3-week trip to Europe which included a skiing trip, carrying only a small backpack.

Dan had just turned 60, and he had taken four months leave this winter to pursue an old dream to revisit South America with a friend – on motor cycles. They had wisely gone on a trial ride in the late summer, riding from Canada to Las Vegas and parking the bikes there in order to test the equipment and not have to ride two-wheelers in the Canadian winter. As a pilot, Dan understood risks very well – or rather, how not to take unnecessary ones.

“If only he had been a little more cautious”, some will say. Was that trip really necessary? These thoughts are unavoidable – but we have to remember that his decision to ride was natural to the adventurous and mischievous spirit that we all knew and loved.